“Sorting all these flavors and how they come to the cup is what interests me, and why it can be just as interesting to untangle the hows and whys of a stale cup as it is to explore the floral and fruity notes of a really fine cup. Staleness is a part of life and part of what happens to all foods. I’m catching the coffee at a different stage in its lifetime, and I think it is good to have the whole spectrum available to think about and experience…”  (Lucky Peach "On Coffee" same guys at the table)

Contrast that with this quote:

“There’s no value in digging shallow wells in a hundred places. Decide on one place and dig deep. Even if you encounter a rock, use dynamite and keep going down. If you leave that to dig another well, all the first effort is wasted and there is no proof you won’t hit rock again. (52)” 

Swami Satchidananda, The Yoga Sutras

Does digging deep necessarily mean that eventually you will hit on the "floral and fruity notes of a really fine cup" or will it eventually lead to a "stale cup"? Following the logic...there is no proof that you are going to hit enlightenment either...just saying Swami! I refuse to spend my entire practice trying to fit a square peg into a round hole and am big enough to admit my mistakes.

I admit to being a dabbler in life but I have often pondered what life would look like on the other side of the fence, what if I focused on just one thing instead of dabbling away at the many? But you know-- Dabbling has led me down a rich and varied path and I'm not sure I would trade it out.  However, I know others who knew seemingly from birth what they wanted to do with their lives, which is best and why? Even better--does it really matter if you get the straight shot or the winding meandering path?

Yoga is the deepest hole that I have ever dug, sometimes I have had to detour, sometimes I have had to renovate, and sometimes I have had to use dynamite but Yoga always seems to find a way to keep me going further down the well. I will admit to a somewhat WIDE hole and that notion is how the studio got its name. I dabble, lots of things interest me, I know a little about a lot of things, and I know a lot about a few things--but all of these things combine to make me the fine and fruity cup of coffee that I am. 

When I first read this quote I was afraid that my teaching and practice was becoming stale. Since that time I have gotten out of some ruts but also I have come to realize that one should not confuse the notion of staleness with the notions of comfort and stability. 

 

 

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